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the humanitarian missions nevertheless will continue. >>> high anxiety. japan pulls emergency workers from its crippled nuclear power plant after surging radiation. dealing with disaster, a new study reveals how prepare suicide the u.s. to deal with the major nuclear emergency. and wave of power -- newly surfaced video shows the force of friday's tsunami as it hits the oregon coastline. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more straight ahead. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with melting point. a skeleton crew working to prevent an all-out meltdown at the fukushima nuclear plant were forced out of the facility for nearly an hour today. the extremely rare measure was called for following a dangerous spike in radiation that japanese authorities feared was a risk to workers' lives. dan shenman reports. >> reporter: authorities in japan have struggled to avert an environmental catastrophe in the plant in tokyo. the rods were being stored in pools of water. seawater has been pumped into reactors one, two, and three to cool fuel rods as they worked to br
: i'm heather childers. rescue workers in japan facing continuous aftershocks and latest on the search for survivors. >> gregg: total door entangling, the death toll rising in the new york bus crash. the search for the person that may be responsible. >> heather: and rebels in libya losing ground because muammar khadafy's forces are surrounding the rebels. how involved should the u.s. get? >> gregg: new details now on a major nuclear scare in japan. japanese officials say radioactivity levels very close to the nuclear plant have gone down in the last several hours. this plant facing a potentially disastrous meltdown after an explosion this morning. take a look at these incredible pictures, clouds of smoke rising from up the reactor area. safety officials are scrambling to contain the damage and evacuating 140,000 people in a 12-mile perimeter. adam housley is streaming live with the latest north of tokyo? >> we're about 20 miles from where we were earlier this morning, 70 miles north and to the eat of tokyo, halfway to where the reactors are. the location we are at southern end of where
unbelievable stories of survival. those are coming out of japan. we'll share them with you. >>> plus, what do you do if you share the house speaker's trademarked orange glow? if you're like this guy, you become a john boehner impersonator and hope you can learn to cry on cue. more coming up later. >>> first, we want to get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. here at 30 rock in new york city. just four days after suffering its most devastating natural disaster ever, japan is now potentially facing the worst nuclear accident since chernobyl. in total, there are 17 nuclear power plants across that country. this crisis largely centers around one complex. it's about 170 miles northeast of tokyo. the crippled fukushima power plant. high levels of radiation leaked from the facility this morning after a third reactor was rocked by an explosion and a fourth caught fire. in a brief address to that nation today, the country's prime minister urged calm but said there was a "very high risk of further leakage." after an emergency cabinet meeting, the japanese cabinet warned 140,000 people living within roughly 1
in the u.s. >>> and more than 10,000 people are feared dead from the earthquake and tsunami in japan. more than 1800 are confirmed dead. more than 1400 are still missing. large areas of the countryside are still surrounded by water and mud. >>> one local effect the damaged santa cruz harbor that will stay closed until next weekend. 18 boats sank and 100 others were damaged when the waves came in after the 8.9 quake in japan. so far two sunken vessels have been recovered and this morning crews are evaluating the damaged and prioritizing boat recovery efforts based on the risk of pollution. the coast guard is enforcing a safety zone meaning boats cannot travel through it. but owners do have access now to their vessels. >>> it is 5:04. let's check weather and traffic. first julie watts. >> good morning. scattered showers out the door this morning. fog along the coast. so be mindful of that and across some bridges. very light scattered showers lingering throughout the morning hours. a closer look. light rainfall from the west to the east. as we move to the second half of the day we'll start t
. and we will as well. >>> back to the story that -- the radiation from the fallout in that crisis in japan. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthq
american evacuations out of japan as nuclear meltdown fears grow. >>> line of fire. security cameras capture a dramatic shootout at a tennessee convenience store. >>> and space odyssey. astronauts unveil the international space station's newest resident. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more are straight ahead. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with exit strategy. as japan's nuclear crisis deepens, and reports about the status of one of its crippled nuclear plants differ, the united states has authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan. nbc's tracie potts joins us from washington with the very latest on this. good morning to you. >> reporter: lynn, good morning. good morning, everyone. we learned overnight these will be voluntary evacuations even though the airports have opened, commercial flights are available. the u.s. state department will now be organizing charter flights out of tokyo and other locations in japan to get americans out. the u.s. believes that the radiation levels, especially around the fukushima daiich
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
health. >>> the body of the first american known to have per risched in japan's disaster has been pound. lee cowan has the story. >> reporter: before march 11th, most americans never heard. that district in japan. taylor anderson knew it in better days. the girl from richmond, virginia made it her home. >> she loved it. she loved the culture and the people. she loved teaching the japanese children. she was living her dream. >> reporter: she taught more than english. she taught compassion. she helped get people out until the time to save herself was gone. >> it took rescuers day to go through the debris. it seemed hopeless. yet, nine days in, a 16-year-old boy was found clinging to a roof, exhausted in cold but alive. he had saved his 80-year-old grandmother, too, after finding the refrigerator stocked with yogurt and coke. i always knew there was something special about it. her parents got a call she had been found. it was a mistake. she was still lost in all of that rubble. in a short statement, her parents wished what her daughters would have wished. please remain playing for all who
and frayed nerves. the latest from japan. how is the radiation in that country now different from what you absorb every day? and they put the squeeze on pro-democracy demonstrators and a look at where the obama administration stands. live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." i'm bret baier. the news from japan continues to be mostly bad. but there was a positive note today, as the owner of the crippled nuclear plant says the new power line is almost done that will enable the restart of electric powered pumps and possibly a solution to the overheating crisis. elevated radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower
on libya coming up at the top of the hour on "morning joe." >>> exactly one week after japan's quake and tsunami, a frantic effort is underway to stem the crisis at the fukushima nuclear plant. the complex's third unit is the main priority since water there is thought to be dangerously low. in a possible setback today, smoke rose from one of the buildings as crews worked to reconnect power to critical systems. the international atomic energy agency is reporting the severity rating of the nuclear crisis has been raised from 4 to 5, on a scale of 1 to 7, with 7 being the worst that would suggest a level of seriousness on par with the three mile accident in the united states in 1979. up to 64 tons of water was dropped in the overreheated reactors yesterday. and the agency says a cable has been restored to the cooling pumps at the second reactor in the plant. throughout the week the japanese government has been criticized about poor communication and the situation. for now the government says it has no plans to expand its mandatory 12-mile exclusion zone around the plant. for more on the
the latest on the only confirmed american death in japan. >>> and thearents of a rutgers student who committed suicide after police say he was taunted for being gay don't want harsh punishment for those accused. >>> and could it be true? does cbs want charlie sheen back on his t ho >>anhepo enti's ltwnthela yi on to the streets of new york. what sent chris brown into a frenzy? >>> i'm tamron hall. the newsmation is following the latest developments in operation odyssey dawn in libya. crew members are back safe in american hands after the f-15e fighter jet crashed overnight. video of the wreckage. two airmen ejected after the plane developed mechanical problems. the fighter jet was on a strike mission against a libyan missile site. the on-scene commander of the international coalition for libya told a news conference, civilians are under attack by moammar gadhafi's forces in misratah and libya's third largest city. the admiral say the coalition is, quote, considering all objections but did not elaborate. among the coalition targets hit todayç libyan naval base in tripoli. lookin
. we find ourselves with the world's most under reported story, a massive humanitarian crisis in japan caused by the quake and the following tsunami. what we could all be doing to help. dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. and fewer pills for a day free of pain. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [ male announcer ] when you have plaque psoria
we were paying $2.82 a gallon. that's almost 75 cen cheaper. >>> now to japan where workers have reconnected power lines to all three reactors, but there is still a great to do before the power can be turned on. the hope is then the cooling systems would work properly. meantime, "new york times" is reporting that up gentlemanen's government approved a ten-year extension for the oldest of six reactors at that power station. just a month before the big earthquake, despite safety warnings. nbc's bob bazzell joins me. what's the latest? >> it look likes they may have turned the corner in the battle to get that under control. yesterday seemed to be a bad day. one of the storage pools was very hot and the radiation readings was as high as they've been in the accident. but the radiation levels have come down, there's electricity to all the reactors, but it can't be turned on yet. it will be a while before they get them going, but it seems like the trend is in the direction that everyone wants it to be, but there could still be a lot of surprises ahead. in the disaster zone there's still
: u.s. navy is rushing to deliver fresh water to japan's damaged nuclear plant to replace the corrosive sea water to try to cool the overheated reashh. fear is the sea water could further compromise efforts to stabilize the reactors. all of this coming as another spike in radiation. japanese government spokesperson the efforts of plant's workers seem to be keeping from the situation getting worse but it's too soon to be optimistic. >> heather: tea party helped the republicans win the house but house speaker john boehner is feeling the heat from some in the tea party movement. tea party nation sounder, he is accusing the speaker of a breaking a pledge to slash spending so he is pushing for a primary opponent against boehner. here is managing editor of the hill. thank you for joining us. let's get off the top, judson phillips he as bull's-eye on the speaker of the house. he says he is a compromised too much when it comes to spending. in your opinion should speaker boehner be concerned and what sort of fracture is this creating on capitol hill? >> she going to win his next re
reactors at japan's krip crippled nuclear plant temperature. they say there is still a lot of work to be done before electricity can be turned on. emergency crews dumped 18 tons of seawater into a nearly boiling pool holding spent nuclear fuel. japan's nikkei market closed with more than a 4% gain today thanks to the good news at the power plant. the index is still 7% lower than its close the day the earthquake and tsunami hit. >>> crews recovered the body of taylor anderson, an american teaching english in miyagi, japan, believed to be the first american victim, the first known one of the quake and tsunami. they estimate miyagi prefecture lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan is live now in seoul, south of korea. what's the story now? what's the situation with fear and whether it is dissipating in that region? >> reporter: i think there is still a lot of fear, it depends on where you are. if you are talking in the north, you are still focused so much on the search and rescue effort. it is still officially search and rescue. they go through the rebel with sticks trying their best
is the crack session for tuesday, march 22nd. a lot today including the latest on japan. plus, the donald looks back fondly on the time he screwed moammar gadhafi. let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. here at 30 rock. >>> coalition forces launched a third attack on libya's capital. according to an american commander, the u.s. is scaling back its role in the conflict with an overwhelming share in yesterday's mission flown by pilots in yesterday's country in the international effort. the no-fly zone will be expanded toward tripoli paving the way for the united states to hand off command of the mission to the european allies. it's stopped gadhafi on benghazi. operation odyssey gone to prevent attacks on civilians is a tougher challenge. the killing continues. the white house may face growing pressure to expand by arming opposition fighters. here now, nbc news is with us live in tripoli with the latest on the ground. hello, jim. >> reporter: good morning, willie. i could use that extra hour of sleep. there were air strikes in and around tripoli last night. we heard at least three explosions. fel
at some point. thank you, william bratton for joiningus. >> can japan import enough bottled water to ease fears of nuclear contamination? >>> open court. chris brown says he's sorry about his latest outburst, but could his morning meltdown land him behind bars? >>> time for the "your business" entrepreneur of the week. beach volley players turned their passion into a year-round activity. they created the sand box in mystic, connecticut, the only indoor volleyball facility in new england. they're attracting players around the reege to this unique concept. watch "your business" sunday mornings 7:30 on msnbc. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] with amazing innovation, driven by relentless competition, wireless puts the world at your command. ♪ wireless puts the world at your command. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [scraping] [piano keys banging] [scraping] [horns honking] iteelie's holdyourarack. let me guess, 16. [laughing] yeeah. that's why there's castrol gtx... w
morning, everybody. this is a shocking development out of japan. imagine how concerned you would be as a parent if there was radiation in the drinking water that was twice the recommended level for infants. >> that's what millions of parents in tokyo are dealing with this morning. levels of radioactive iodine were found at a treatment center. now parents are advised not to give it to infants. the latest in a live report from tokyo ahead. >> also ahead, richard engel has made his way to the rebel front lines in libya following a fourth straight night of coalition missile strikes. >> a lot of serious stories to talk about. but on a lighter note, have you seen this viral video. this is a 5-month-old boy who can't decide what to make of the sound of his mom blowing her nose. first he's laughing, then horrified. then bursts out laughing again. i think 8 million people have watched this online. we'll watch the little boy and his parents coming up. >> on a more serious note, the dangerousle levels of radiation in tokyo's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bo
and sleeplessness. motrin pm. >>> black smoke is rising from reactor number 3, forcing workers to evacuate japan's fukushima nuclear plant today. officials haven't said what caused it or whether any radiation was released. the japanese have confirmed that radiation levels in tokyo's tap water is more than twice what's considered safe for babies. so word has gone out to the city's 13 million residents not to use tap water to make infant formula. >>> and more radiation concerns in food. the government has added broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage to the list of tainted vegetables consumers should avoid and the u.s. is the first to ban produce and dairy products from some parts of japan. >>> michi kaku is a city of new york professor of physics and author of "physics of the future." always good to see you. if obviously you gasp when you hear baby's formula can't be made with water. do you think it's a matter of time before children and adults are advised not to drink it? >> well the good news is radiation levels are still low and if there's no more radiation from the reactor in about a month radiatio
on the attac >>> setback. just hours after officials reporting progress at the nuclear plant in japan. smoke rising from the reactor forced them to evacuate again. this as japan halts shipments of milk and vegetables near the site over fears of contamination. >>> and a female wing walker fighting for her life after her husband was forced to crash land the airplane. he speaks about her condition today, monday march 21, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. busy monday morning. i'm matt lauer. ann curry is back from japan, in for meredith. what an extra job you did over that on what had to be a difficult trip. >> it was difficult for everyone involved. i think we are all thinking of the people that are still there and especially there japanese. we'll have the latest from japan including the latest evacuation of the workers from the nuclear power plant and also the detection of radiation on spinach and milk coming up, matt. >> also ahead the u.s. army is issuing an apology for disturbing photos that portray abuse allegedly
weapon systems, perhaps a quicker drawdown, why are we still in europe? and other overseas miss. japan we allow them to -- we provide their military shield. it's time for some of these other countries to grow up. >> peter, you have a very positive statement, and i agree, but in that same bill, i think it was and we got about 120 people to vote for it. we're still building bridges in afghanistan, but i agree with you. >> i was with you on that vote. i want to build infrastructure they're in the united states. >> i love this love coming out on this program. >> when we look at defense, it's historically been the republican party blocked anything in that direction. they said i can't believe the democrats would do that, attention, how do you get beyond that? look at what our president is doing. he had a very strong statement about our need to be involve in libya. he expanded the war in afghanistan. oy 'bama is getting close to the possible. i think it's bipartisan. it's a bipartisan mess, and i think that republicans a lot of republicans and democrats outside of washington still expect a lot f
, you made what had to have been a gut-retching experience. you decided to have a career in japan and leaving behind your children and husband. >> yes. >> your relationship didn't survive. >> at the time we were in agreement that i should go. this was my work and what i wanted to. i went to interview the survivors of the first atomic bomb. when i was there, september 11th happened. that with the separation we had broke along all the fault lines in our relationship. but, when i decided to have children, you know, as a young woman i never wanted to be a mother. i wouldn't say i don't want my children but i didn't want to be a mother because motherhood to me was this thing, this good mother thing that kind of comes at you like a freight train. i didn't want to give up every single bit of my time and identity. >> the point you make is you can be a good mother without being a present mother. my husband is the one who wanted kids. i didn't have to live with them to be a good mother. a lot of moms are going to say that can't be a mom. your responsibility is to be at home packing sandwich
dinner in japan in 1986. this was a famous dinner. remember, he had the chopsticks upside down? >> i remember that. >> that could sell for as much as $80,000. another dress which spoke about evolution of the princess, that beautiful robe she wore to a state dinner. $100,000. the woman reunning the auction house said most of the interest comes from the u.s. a lot of the bidders are foreign. not britain. >> we have a guest book, a fascination on this side of the pond. >> we do. >> thanks, bianna. i want the hat. >>> let get more on this from our expert on all things, royal katie nicholl, the author of "the making of a royal romance." we could have news on the dress. "the sunday times" reported that the designer could be sarah burton, the creative director of alexander mcqueen. she's designed it. the palace is saying basically nothing. try and sort it out for us. >> the palace are going to be very noncommittal. they made it clear right from the start when i planned that first conference, that nothing would come out on the dress. that kate would keep it completely secret. but somebody ha
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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